IMMIGRATION

Immigration

The U.S. immigration system is complex, and there is a lot of confusion about how it works. The U.S. immigration system is built on the following principles: reuniting families, admitting immigrants with skills that are valuable to the U.S. economy, protecting refugees, and promoting diversity.

Immigration

U.S. immigration law is complex, and there is much confusion as to how it works. Immigration law in the United States has been built upon the following principles: the reunification of families, admitting immigrants with skills that are valuable to the U.S. economy, protecting refugees, and promoting diversity. The first step in immigrating to the U.S. is to determine your eligibility for a visa. There are many different types of visas, each with its own set of requirements and benefits. For example, if you have a close relative who is a U.S citizen or permanent resident and they sponsor you as an immediate relative (spouse, parent or unmarried minor child), then you can apply for an immediate relative visa such as an IR-1 or IR-2 visa depending on your relationship status (single or married). If you have no relatives who can sponsor you but have skills that are valuable to the U.S., then you may be eligible for an employment-based visa such as an EB1 or EB3 visa which require labor certification from the Department of Labor before filing your application with USCIS (U.S Citizenship and Immigration Services). If you are unable to qualify for any of these visas based on economic need or family ties.